Open dialogues: interview with Chen Li

by Margaret Sgarra

Tarda Primavera

Artist, calligrapher and graphic designer, Chen Li has made word as the fulcrum of her artistic research. Letters, signs and colors give shape to a complex imagination in which poetry, reflection and creativity meet. In a society where image seems to have greater importance than content and handwriting replaced by digital, Chen Li protects its visual essence and extraordinary beauty through her works.

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Who’s next?… Fernando Melani

by Valentina Biondini, art and literature amateur

Melani’s Studio-Home

This time we focus our attention on what was considered the “first post-war artist-scientist” and “the last of the millennium”. We are talking about Fernando Melani from Pistoia, whose creative dimension was inspired by reflections on matter and atom, and then approached, even anticipating, the influences of Arte Povera, Conceptual Art and Minimal Art.

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Silence is noisy in Savina Capecci’s paintings

by Romina Ciulli and Carole Dazzi

Imperfect like pure amber

Savina Capecci’s artistic universe is made up of bright and powerful colours, and tells stories related to contemporary society through an ironic, if not downright unreal, perspective. Indeed, in her work the protagonists seem to live a detached existence within an imaginary that always remains suspended between two dimensions: the experiential and the natural. Read more

Open dialogues: interview with Barbara Pavan

by Margaret Sgarra

The Soft Revolution, a cura di Barbara Pavan – Museo del Tessile di Busto Arsizio

Born in Monza and raised in Biella among looms and yarns, Barbara Pavan is a curator and art critic specialized in fiber art. The passion for the yarn has led her to design and curate exhibitions, art projects, catalogs and thematic blogs, thus becoming a reference point for textile expressive forms.

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Sharon Harris/The evocative fascination of pinhole photography

by Romina Ciulli & Carole Dazzi

Un-travelling #13

Sometimes a photograph taken with naturalness is enough to show the hidden side of reality or emotions, where the images, even if not very defined, appear incredibly sharp and engaging. This is what happens with the pinhole photography, one of the first techniques used in the photography, which doesn’t use lenses or objectives but, through a small pinhole, it generates images where gaze regains possession of a sensory tale that is extraordinary every time. The American photographer Sharon Harris uses this technique, and her photographs depict ethereal, sensual female figures, captured in surreal atmospheres and eccentric attitudes. Read more