Aysegul Altunok/Installations-space: an experiential bond

Aysegul Altunok/Installations-space: an experiential bond

With her sculptural works integrated in natural environments, Ayşegül Altunok creates immersive and unexpected sensations. Let’s talk about it with the artist.

Your work is structured through a series of sculptures/installations whithin natural spaces where they seem to represent in a certain way projections of the human existence, and at the same time they have the tendency to pass the limit of this very same experience. Can you tell us how these projects are conceived and how your creative process is developed? Read more

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Andrea Carpita / The portrait as abstraction of the form

Andrea Carpita / The portrait as abstraction of the form

Interview with the young Italian painter who experiments diverse iconographic techniques to reread the art of figurative representation.

Photography, digital image and painting are three closely linked phases through which your work is structured. Can you tell us about it?

These three elements (photography, digital image, painting) are in fact the three chronological phases around which each painting generally develops. Read more

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Shira Gold / Landscape portraits: an intimate journey through grief, rediscovery and change

Shira Gold / Landscape portraits: an intimate journey through grief, rediscovery and change

The canadian photographer Shira Gold creates images that in their scenic isolation try to combine aspects such as stillness and beauty with those of  pain and suffering. Drawing to her experiences of woman, daughter and mother, Shira faces the frequently tormented vicissitudes of our existence, by means of acts of exploration, rediscovery and wonder. Read more

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Who’s next?… Ketty La Rocca

Who’s next?… Ketty La Rocca

Written by Valentina Biondini, literature amateur

This time the “Who’s Next?” column is dedicated to a peculiar Italian artist whose artworks developed between the 1960s and 1970s in our country. Then she was consigned to oblivion at least until the early 2000s, when some scholars recovered her memory. We are talking about Ketty La Rocca, whose purpose was giving to art the task of defining the relationship with reality and its knowledge. She had a scratchy, intimate and personal female gaze, but also capable of turning into universal. Read more

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Dellaclà/The art of self-representation

Dellaclà/The art of self-representation

The eclectic Italian artist talks about her way of exploring human instability through the stillness of objects.

Starting point of your projects are often animals remains (such as bones, horns, skulls, etc.) that are manipulated and carved throught the use of different techniques. What does this creative process mean?

The precariousness of existence, the metamorphosis, the change. The shape and the usual content of the animals remains acquire diverse archaic meanings, even basing on the experience of who watches them. Read more

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Samantha Passaniti/Art is a dialogue between soul and nature

Samantha Passaniti/Art is a dialogue between soul and nature

Interview with the Italian artist who uses the elements of nature to express an inner dimension.

Where does the choice of using natural materials as artistic expression come from? And what is the method by which the creative process of your work develops?

My research is always focused on nature observation. I was born and grow in a little town situated on the sea of Tuscan Maremma and surely my roots are at the base of my innate interest toward the natural world. I’ve always tried to observe the landscape reproducing it in an original and evocative way, without ever being too much tied to reality. Read more

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Who’s next?… Elvira Notari

Who’s next?… Elvira Notari

Written by Valentina Biondini, literature amateur

In the second episode of the “Who’s Next?” column, we are going to focus our imaginary camera on an Italian woman who successfully moved into the fields of screenplay and direction, in the first two decades of the last century. This woman goes under the name of Elvira Notari and she is universally known as the first Italian film director and one of the first in the world (together with Alice Guy-Blaché, French director and film producer). Read more

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Ricardo Reis/ A matter of perspective

Ricardo Reis/ A matter of perspective

Interview with the Portuguese photographer who explores the connection between individual and reality through a surrealistic black and white.

Can you introduce yourself? And how do you create your shots?

My name is Ricardo Reis and I’m an artist. When I started, I wanted to be a war photographer, but in my home country of Portugal, it’s very difficult to get the connections necessary to achieve that. Anyway, I was fortunate because I got an internship at a daily newspaper in Portugal. This activity led my work to being published in several major newspapers and magazines. Read more

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